When Harold Met William | e=mc2andallthat

Legend has it that in 1988, U.S. Presidential candidate Michael Dukakis opened an election rally in front of a huge crowd in a red state with the ringing words: “This joke will appeal to the Latin scholars amongst you…” He went on to lose decisively to George H. W. Bush.

On that note, this joke will appeal to all the Physics teachers (and other aficionados of the dot-and-cross convention).

For the non-physicists amongst you, this is an illustration of the dot-and-cross convention, which allows us to represent 3D objects on a 2D diagram. The dot represents a vector emerging out of the…

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http://ift.tt/2he3S2h

When Harold Met William | e=mc2andallthat

Legend has it that in 1988, U.S. Presidential candidate Michael Dukakis opened an election rally in front of a huge crowd in a red state with the ringing words: “This joke will appeal to the Latin scholars amongst you…” He went on to lose decisively to George H. W. Bush.

On that note, this joke will appeal to all the Physics teachers (and other aficionados of the dot-and-cross convention).

For the non-physicists amongst you, this is an illustration of the dot-and-cross convention, which allows us to represent 3D objects on a 2D diagram. The dot represents a vector emerging out of the…

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2he3S2h

Engelmann (and John Stuart Mill) Revisited | e=mc2andallthat

Even for the most enthusiastic and committed of us, Engelmann and Carnine’s Theory of Instruction (1982) is a fabulously intimidating read.

I have written about some of the ideas before, but a recent conversation with a fellow Physics teacher (I’m looking at you, @DeepGhataura) suggested to me that a revisit might be in order.

In a nutshell, we were talking about sets of examples. Engelmann and Carnine argue that learners learn when they construct generalisations or inferences from sets of examples. It is therefore essential that the sets of examples are carefully chosen and sequenced so…

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2uokU39

Engelmann (and John Stuart Mill) Revisited | e=mc2andallthat

Even for the most enthusiastic and committed of us, Engelmann and Carnine’s Theory of Instruction (1982) is a fabulously intimidating read.

I have written about some of the ideas before, but a recent conversation with a fellow Physics teacher (I’m looking at you, @DeepGhataura) suggested to me that a revisit might be in order.

In a nutshell, we were talking about sets of examples. Engelmann and Carnine argue that learners learn when they construct generalisations or inferences from sets of examples. It is therefore essential that the sets of examples are carefully chosen and sequenced so…

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2uokU39

Physics Limericks: Some Classics | e=mc2andallthat

The following two are, I believe, by famed textbook writer A. P. French

There was a young fellow named Cole

Who ventured too near a black hole

    His dv by dt

    Was quite wondrous to see

Now all that’s left is his soul!

Ms. Farad was pretty and sensual

And charged to a reckless potential

     But a rascal named Ohm

     Conducted her home.

Her decline was, alas, exponential!

I came across this one recently, and I like its subtle cleverness.

Relatively Good Advice

by Edward H. Green

Dear S’: I note with distress

The length of your yardstick is less

   …

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2u6qqab

Physics Limericks: Some Classics | e=mc2andallthat

The following two are, I believe, by famed textbook writer A. P. French

There was a young fellow named Cole

Who ventured too near a black hole

    His dv by dt

    Was quite wondrous to see

Now all that’s left is his soul!

Ms. Farad was pretty and sensual

And charged to a reckless potential

     But a rascal named Ohm

     Conducted her home.

Her decline was, alas, exponential!

I came across this one recently, and I like its subtle cleverness.

Relatively Good Advice

by Edward H. Green

Dear S’: I note with distress

The length of your yardstick is less

And…

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2u6qqab

The Pedagog Teaches PRAD | e=mc2andallthat

Queen Mary made the doleful prediction that, after her death, you would find the words ‘Philip’ and ‘Calais’ engraved upon heart. In a similar vein, the historians of futurity might observe that, in the early years of the 21st century, the dread letters “R.I.” were burned indelibly on the hearts of many of the teachers of Britain.

In a characteristically iconoclastic post, blogger Requires Improvement ruminates on those very same words that he adopted as his nom de guerre: R.I. or “requires improvement”.

He argues convincingly that the Requirement to Improve was, in reality, nothing more…

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http://ift.tt/2tE0N0O