Subject Character Plots: Developing the model for discussing curriculum | Rosalind Walker

In my previous post I presented a series of axes which built on Legitimation Code Theory. I suggested that these axes could be used to produce subject character plots (SCPs) that allow us to explore the characteristics of school subjects, to draw comparisons, and to create a common language that allows communication across the subject divides. In this short post I would like to share some developments I have made to the model and invite discussion.

The quadrants device used in Legitimation Code Theory is extremely powerful. It allows us to consider an aspect along two dimensions of…

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My ASE Talk January 10th 2019 – How to Teach Problem Solving in Science (with added Bar-Models!) | BenRogers

I have planned the outline of my ASE Annual Conference talk (Thursday 12.00). It may develop a little, but the gist is:
Numerical Problems in Science
What does Cognitive load Theory teach us about problem solving?
The CLT model
Goal Free Effect
Worked Examples
Completion Problems
Expertise Reversal Effect

How can Efrat Furst’s models help us plan to develop problem solving in learners? (here and here)
The Bar Model: How can the Singapore Maths method of Concrete/Pictorial/Abstract help develop problem solving skills in science? (Download my bumper examples pack: Using Bar-Model to…

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#adventbookclub John the Baptist 20181209 | grahart

The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne and Saint John the Baptist, 1499-1500 Leonardo da Vinci 
Gaudete! Gaudete! Celebrated by pink candles and rose fiddleback chasuables on the third Sunday of Advent, today’s thoughts are on the Baptist himself.  The man, whose cry “on Jordan’s banks… announces that the Lord is nigh”, had a hard life:

born as a result of prayer to childless parents (a familiar motif is this: think Abram and Sarai, Isaac, Hannah, Rachel… difficulty conceiving, childless, elderly…); a decision made for him from birth to become a Nazarite, and so link into a long line of…

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Subject Character Plots: Developing the model for discussing curriculum | Rosalind Walker

In my previous post I presented a series of axes which built on Legitimation Code Theory. I suggested that these axes could be used to produce subject character plots (SCPs) that allow us to explore the characteristics of school subjects, to draw comparisons, and to create a common language that allows communication across the subject divides. In this short post I would like to share some developments I have made to the model and invite discussion.

The quadrants device used in Legitimation Code Theory is extremely powerful. It allows us to consider an aspect along two dimensions of…

Continue reading at:
https://ift.tt/2L7Cq1t

#adventbookclub Prophets 20181208 | grahart

Jeremiah lamenting the destruction of Jerusalem 1630 Rembrandt van Rijt
Sic transit gloria mundi.  

I’m writing this Friday night, after a delightful performing arts evening at school: dance, song, sketch, music. Some great (the dancing in particular was excellent), some fine, a couple which could have done with some more rehearsal. But in all, this was lovely, and gave hope that despite the (sometimes) grind of academic life there is still a piece of humanity in schools.  Such a display of culture, of lightening the soul, is (some might say) the pinnacle and goal of a civilisation.

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Teacher Autonomy: Part II – Curriculum & Teaching | BunsenBlue

Part II
In my previous post, I argued that teacher autonomy is worth sacrificing when it comes to decisions about behaviour systems. I suggested that this is the only way true consistency can be achieved and that consistency is essential for good behaviour to flourish. This is because good behaviours are good habits, which are forged through constant feedback.

What about teaching?

Every teacher within a subject community has similar goals for their pupils, ultimately. But every teacher also has a different set of pupils in front of them. Every teacher has their own personality, likes and…

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Working Hard | drwilkinsonsci

The lesson finishes, the observer waves and I give a knowing nod, there’s no time to catch up now, they have a lesson to get ready for. As do I. Like mythical punctual buses, there is always another lesson just a few minutes behind this one.

We do catch up though, at lunchtime, for a friendly chat about the lesson. A friendly chat, because it’s a peer-observation as part of our Teaching & Learning Group that I’ve started this year. No grades, just useful feedback on a lesson with a particular focus each term.  The observer has some good feedback for me; a few boys on the back row who I…

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