Sentences and the web of knowledge | Rosalind Walker

This blog is part 3 of the #WritingInScience symposium curated by Pritesh Raichura. Read Pritesh’s introduction here and part 2 from Ben Rogers here.

Do you ever stop to marvel at the extent of human thought? I do, and it takes my breath away. Isn’t it wonderful to be able to think about interesting, abstract things, and to learn the thoughts of other people to have something to think with? A human left to grow up on their own without language would be almost entirely unable to think beyond base animal instincts. Language gives shape to our thoughts, it allows us to pass them from one to…

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Classroom Screen – Handy Set of Teaching Apps for your Whiteboard | Danny Nicholson

Classroom Screen is a handy set of teaching apps that you can use on your interactive whiteboard. It gives you several great tools at your fingertips. These include a mini whiteboard, timer, name picker and more. There are two drawing tools. The first one turns the whole page into a drawing pad which includes graph […]

Classroom Screen – Handy Set of Teaching Apps for your Whiteboard
The Whiteboard Blog – Education, Technology and Science CPD and Support

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Give me a beer… | paulweeks2014

Sometimes I just like to be silly.

Let me qualify that.

There are times, particularly when immersed in the complexities of metabolic pathways, that it really pays to do something different, to lighten the mood and provide another way of looking at something. Of course, you also want to provide something that helps the students understand a tricky concept, and if what you do is unusual and memorable, then it will also help them retain that understanding.

Here are my dramatis personae:

Yes, you got that right. A purple cuddly elephant (a Xmas present from a tutor pupil), 2 juggling…

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I’ll never set a project again. | Adam

Years ago, I used to set a “model atom” project. In line with a school priority about developing independence, and my own beliefs about engaging students in science outside the classroom, I set the project with gusto. I carefully prepared level ladders and checklists to make sure students were including the information I wanted and were properly researching their atom of choice.

When due date came along, my lab had never seen so much activity before 8.30am. Beaming students, bedecked with enormous models, came in and out to lay their precious cargo on the sides, wary of damaging them in…

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Deliberate Practice | dodiscimus

My son is a keen but fairly mediocre member of an U9 football team. However, he has great hand-eye co-ordination (potentially an excellent cricketer) and has posted 38s for 50m freestyle (he’s been swimming from very young, is big and strong, and seems to have a remarkable ability to listen and respond to coaching when it applies to body movement). So, generally sporty, but why not so good at football, despite wanting to be?

His problem is that his decision-making under pressure is not great on the football pitch. Now I really know diddly-squat about invasion games so this is all…

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Give me a beer… | paulweeks2014

Sometimes I just like to be silly.

Let me qualify that.

There are times, particularly when immersed in the complexities of metabolic pathways, that it really pays to do something different, to lighten the mood and provide another way of looking at something. Of course, you also want to provide something that helps the students understand a tricky concept, and if what you do is unusual and memorable, then it will also help them retain that understanding.

Here are my dramatis personae:

Yes, you got that right. A purple cuddly elephant (a Xmas present from a tutor pupil), 2 juggling…

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A Knowledge Curriculum, Informed by Cognitive Science with a Disciplinary Literacy Focus | BenRogers

Colleagues at Paradigm Trust are developing a KS1-3 curriculum. It is a knowledge curriculum, informed by cognitive science with a disciplinary literacy focus. So far, we have written material for science, history, geography and RE.

I have just completed a year 6 packet that I’d like to share. It isn’t the full curriculum, just a sort of textbook for the unit.

How Astronomers Learnt that ‘The Heavens’ Are Not Perfect Y6 Aut2.2

We’d appreciate feedback.

Ben

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